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English as a Second Language

Viewing entries tagged with 'language'

6Apr2016

Useful Expressions at the Airport

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You have probably found yourself at the airport more than once in your life, but it is still useful to repeat expressions and phrases, which can help you avoid hassle. So when you are at the airport, there are some stages you have to go through.

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29Mar2016

Face the Music

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Here is another musical idiom you might hear from time to time. The full expression is “turn and face the music,” but you’ll also hear people say “it’s time to face the music.”

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24Mar2016

Vocabulary Useful at a Hotel

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As soon as you arrive at a hotel, you have to check-in at the reception or front desk. Get ready to spend some time there, as the receptionist has to find your reservation, request payment for the room, and then provide you with all the information on the hotel and its amenities and policies. You are also given a key (very often, a keycard) to your room.

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11Mar2016

Play It By Ear

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Do you play a musical instrument? Have you ever sat down at a piano and pressed the keys until you hear a familiar tune? If so, then you understand the literal meaning of this expression.

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7Mar2016

Expressing Joy and Happiness

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We all use a lot of different interjections when we express emotions. These words have no grammatical meaning, however, they help express what we feel.

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8Jan2016

Rule of Thumb

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There is no official explanation for how this expression developed, but most people think it has to do with measuring distance; an average thumb is about an inch long, so if you don’t have a ruler, you can use your thumb as a substitute. It makes sense then that "rule of thumb" has come to mean ANY GUIDING PRINCIPLE OR GENERAL METHOD FOR DOING THINGS. It’s not intended to be 100% accurate all the time, but it can be useful in certain situations. 

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23Dec2015

Couch Potato

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Here is an expression that we use to describe a person who likes to spend their free time being lazy, sitting on the couch, and watching TV all day. These people usually do not get enough physical activity.

"I wish my roommate wouldn't lay in front of the TV all weekend. It would be nice for us to hangout, but she is a couch potato!"

So, as we begin our weekend, let me encourage you: DON'T BE A COUCH POTATO!!! Get outside and have some fun!

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26Jun2015

Paint the town

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Last night as I was cooking dinner, Michael Jackson's song "The Way You Make Me Feel" came on the radio. As I was dancing around my kitchen and singing the song, I heard this expression and wanted to share it with you!

To 'paint the town' or 'paint the town red' means that someone is going to go out and have a really good time. Usually, this involves going to numerous parties or bars in one night. 

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22May2015

HAVE a hand vs. GIVE a hand

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If you HAVE A HAND IN something, it means you are participating in or involved with something.

If you GIVE someone A HAND, you are helping them do something. Let’s use the party in the picture to show the difference. Let's pretend that Stacy's best friend threw her a surprise birthday party and that she planned it with Stacy's sisters. 

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18May2015

Run Over

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Phrasal Verb: RUN OVER

The phrasal verb 'run over' has a few different meanings. Let's take a look at how we use them.

1. To hit something with a vehicle. "This time of year, you have to be careful not to RUN OVER all the squirrels that are in the streets."

2. To knock someone down. "I know I'm not a fast runner, but the other guys didn't have to RUN me OVER once the race began!"

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